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Old 06-23-2007, 07:35 AM   #16
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

That 38 inch vert is something that stuck out to me reading those numbers. That is something I won't believe until I see it. The last guy that I have truly been impressed by a player vert was Ben Wallace, it was like 38" or 42".
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Old 06-23-2007, 07:46 AM   #17
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoseCity07
That 38 inch vert is something that stuck out to me reading those numbers. That is something I won't believe until I see it. The last guy that I have truly been impressed by a player vert was Ben Wallace, it was like 38" or 42".


http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/draft...3dYi-Conundrum

I hope someone can paste here the whole article guys if any one of you is an ESPN Insider can you post the link.
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Old 06-23-2007, 07:58 AM   #18
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Those stats seem fabricated and tweaked. That said I wouldnt mind Sixers trading up to land him. But Yi Jianlian and his agent have said there will target certain teams to play for. Not sure what teams those are...but he wont go to every lottery team...meaning i can see Sacremento being a place he says "I dont wanna go". So maybe Philly is the same because i dont sense a strong asian population/base here compared to maybe other cities?

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Old 06-23-2007, 09:29 AM   #19
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Talking Re: Yi's measurements

Tim Kawakami of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS writes, "As I mentioned in the column (briefly), Mullin could be blowing smoke, but he sure doesn’t sound like somebody about to move heaven, earth, and Monta Ellis in order to move up in the draft to pluck Chinese 7-footer Yi Jianlian. In fact, Mullin didn’t sound particularly crazy-in-love with anybody in the draft (yet), and he’s about half-way through the Warriors’ individual workout/meet-and-greet final draft process."
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:10 AM   #20
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

I like Yi...7 foot moves like a guard and has a jumper combined with a good understanding of the game...I take at #5....
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:46 AM   #21
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GOBB
Those stats seem fabricated and tweaked. That said I wouldnt mind Sixers trading up to land him. But Yi Jianlian and his agent have said there will target certain teams to play for. Not sure what teams those are...but he wont go to every lottery team...meaning i can see Sacremento being a place he says "I dont wanna go". So maybe Philly is the same because i dont sense a strong asian population/base here compared to maybe other cities?

Apparantly Yi Jianlian's manager said that he didn't want Yi to play in a small market team, so teams like Memphis etc. don't really stand a chance of getting him. I don't have link to this BTW, it's just something I have read from numerous people over and over, so take it for what it's worth.
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:48 AM   #22
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

He pretty light for his size maybe thats why he can actually run the floor.
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:53 AM   #23
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Those numbers are bogus, especially the weight. I watched a few of his playoff games and there is no way he is 248. I would say 235 max.

He does have excellent speed and agility for his height but i am not too impressed with his skills. His jumper looks average and he doesn't have much game off the dribble. He can't do anything going left. And he doesn't take contact well at all so he struggles to post up.
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:56 AM   #24
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Here's the whole article.

Every player in the draft has a certain risk-reward quotient.

Greg Oden's risk factor went up a point or two this week when word trickled in that his physical from the predraft camp in Orlando was red-flagged with concerns about the long-term health of his wrist and a bulging disk in his back. This could certainly give Portland pause before drafting him No. 1.

Meanwhile, Kevin Durant caused an uproar several weeks ago when he tested as the worst athlete in the draft. No one believes Durant is a bad athlete, but the test results raised questions about his preparation for the draft.

For the teams drafting just below Portland and Seattle, one of the biggest risk-reward questions regards a player some see as the best talent in the draft not named Oden or Durant:


Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Image

Yi was well-received during a Venice Beach boardwalk stroll last month.

Chinese forward Yi Jianlian looks great in workouts, but can he play in the NBA?

That question has been on the minds of several NBA general mangers as they consider using a lottery pick to draft Yi. With a little more than a week to go before the draft, teams are trying to decide whether Yi is the next international star or just a workout wonder.

A month ago in L.A., I watched Yi work out, and he was very impressive -- in fact, Yi's workout ranked right up there with Oden's among the very best I've seen this year.

Yi has size, athleticism and skill. He measures 7-foot-1 in shoes, with a 7-foot-4¼ wingspan, huge hands and a 38-inch vertical jump. He runs up and down the floor well and is very quick laterally. And he's adding muscle (he's up to 248 pounds).

He's an exceptional shooter from midrange and he's beginning to develop range from the NBA 3-point line. He has a good handle and knows how to put the ball on the floor to get to the rim. He has excellent footwork in the paint and a strong work ethic.

In short, in two days of workouts, it was clear that his athleticism and skills are at the NBA level. From a pure talent standpoint, only Oden and Durant appear to have more upside.

But as we've all seen over the years, what a player does in a workout doesn't always translate to a five-on-five basketball game.

The Celtics, Hawks, Bulls, Kings, Clippers, Lakers, Warriors and Sixers have already watched Yi go through the same workout I saw. They have offered similar praise and raised similar concerns.

Since seeing Yi in L.A., I've been doing more digging on him -- watching more game footage and talking to more scouts. I even got a former teammate of Yi's, American Jason Dixon, on the phone. The picture they paint is one of both untapped potential and uncertainty.


Is Yi The Real Deal?

It really depends on whom you ask. Since I wrote my first story on Yi, I've been flooded with e-mails and a few phone calls from skeptics. While everyone agrees that Yi is an interesting prospect and one of the elite players in China, some think he is being vastly overrated by NBA teams.

Why?

The two common concerns I am hearing are about his age and about his lack of toughness and overall basketball IQ.

19 or 22?


I've been given lots of information that suggest Yi is closer to 22 than 19. The information is not definitive, but I tend to believe it. So does Dixon, Yi's teammate for the last four years.

As I wrote a month ago, the evidence suggests that Yi's birth date has been altered on official documents.

This is thought to be a common practice outside of the U.S. and Western Europe. Questions about age have dogged African and Russian players for years. Dikembe Mutombo's real age has been a running joke for the past decade. And even U.S.-born LeBron James and Greg Oden have had their age questioned.

"I'd say he's 21 or 22," Dixon said regarding Yi during a phone interview from his home in Denver. "He's been with the team for four years. I don't think he started with the club when he was 15. It's pretty common over [in China] to change ages."

It would certainly raise the ire of international fans who have watched Yi dominate in Under-18 and Under-20 competitions to find that it was because he was older.

But do NBA teams care? I couldn't find a GM who thought, even if Yi is really 22, that it should affect his draft status.

"I don't see what the big deal is," Celtics vice president Danny Ainge told me. "In some ways, it helps him. It means he's more mature and more ready to handle the pressure of the NBA."

Ainge's opinion was echoed by almost everyone in the NBA that I spoke with.

Tough enough?


The other issue that is raised has to do with toughness. Yi is seen by some as a player who has yet to develop into a go-to player. He still, at times, defers to his older teammates, despite being the most talented player on the floor. Yao Ming faced similar criticism his first few years in the league. Other top players in the draft including Oden, Brandan Wright, Al Horford, Joakim Noah, Jeff Green and Julian Wright also have question marks in this area.

Can Yi develop into a go-to guy in the pros?

Said one NBA scout who has spent months in China over the past few years, "In China, the American on the team is supposed to be the best player and the guy that the rest of the players on the team defer to. I think it's a matter of point of view. Americans don't expect talented players to defer. But it's different in China.

"It starts with the club, goes down to the coach and filters into the mind-set of the players. I wouldn't read a lot into that. I think it's more a cultural issue than a basketball issue. I think Yi, once he understands the NBA and gets comfortable as a player, will be more assertive."

A contingent of veteran international scouts who have seen Yi regularly over the past few years agrees that Yi has many areas he needs to improve in, but that questions about toughness or basketball skill are present with every prospect -- including Oden and Durant -- and are just amplified because Yi is more of an unknown product.

"I think he's mentally tough enough," Dixon said. "He goes really hard every day in practice. He gets to the gym before everyone else to work on his game and he's the last one to leave. He's shown a hunger to improve. He's very coachable. He's down to earth and still somewhat humble."

Still, the "soft" critique remains, and Yi has been unable to eradicate it because he hasn't been working out against anyone. Put him in a workout with Noah or Horford and we might see something. Instead he's either worked out alone or, in the last few workouts, against unheralded college center Brian Cusworth.

With inconclusive evidence gathered in the workouts, teams have to go back to the tape. What they'll find is a player who's more comfortable playing on the perimeter.

Although Yi's team, the Guangdong Tigers, did ask him to play down low at times, it's clear that Yi doesn't like contact and would prefer to shoot jumpers. Yi also appears to be indifferent on the defensive end of the floor in game film -- another factor in the softness question.
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:57 AM   #25
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Second Half of the Whole Article:

Are you Dirk Nowitzki or Tim Thomas? Guess we'll just have to wait and see.

Of course the same criticism has been leveled at NBA MVP Dirk Nowitzki for years.

Like Dirk, Yi is going to be a face-the-basket, perimeter-oriented 4 in the NBA -- at least at first. You can expect him to do a lot of spotting up and running the floor on the offensive end. His athleticism and his midrange jump shot are the best things going for him at the moment, and he'll use them. He still needs work on his aggressiveness in hitting the glass and taking advantage of smaller players in the post.

Even his outside shooting isn't entirely a strong suit for him heading into the draft. Several teams have questioned whether Yi will have NBA 3-point range. He shot just 18 percent from the international 3-point line in China this year, and hasn't been shooting it consistently from the NBA arc in some of his workouts.

Dixon said teams shouldn't worry.

"He has a very, very good shot," Dixon said. "In fact he strokes it as well as any big guy you'll see. He's a pick-and-pop, perimeter-oriented guy. I don't have any question about that. The truth is that the coach here didn't really ask him to shoot 3s. I'm not sure they always knew how to use Yi. He was stuck in the post a lot. Our guards were the ones who were supposed to shoot that shot.

"It wasn't really until last year that Yi started stepping behind the line and taking shots. It's not a big part of his game now but it could be. He has flawless mechanics. In practice he's now hitting that shot maybe 65 to 70 percent of the time. Give him a couple of months to adjust to that in the NBA and I don't think it will be an issue."

Dixon also said that the rest of Yi's game points to NBA success.

"Athletically he's ready right now," said Dixon, who said he plays with a lot of the Nuggets in the summer at the Pepsi Center. "He can hang right now. He's still got a lot to learn about the game, but physically he's ready."

And, Dixon said, he is capable handling adversity.

"We had a tough year," he said. "He had a lot of eyes looking at him. Our team wasn't as good as it's been in the past. I think there was pressure to showcase Yi for NBA teams. So Yi was put in a tough position and I think he handled it pretty well."


The Workout Game


A trickle of recent stories suggesting Yi could be slipping in the draft may have been written in part due to the frustration, from media and teams, with the restrictions put on Yi's workouts.

His agent, Dan Fegan, has limited the ability of teams to see Yi, which has led to a spate of criticism from those who haven't been given access.

Yi even skipped the NBA draft combine -- the only player projected in the top 15 to skip the event -- meaning that teams and media didn't get his measurements and the chance to see him in drills.

Although all of the teams that I have spoken with who've seen Yi work out in L.A. have come away impressed, they also have had a level of frustration that they can't see more of him.

However, Fegan says that teams are given hands-on access to Yi. Danny Ainge and Doc Rivers got on the floor with Yi and had the opportunity to take him through specific drills and plays. Others have been afforded the same opportunity.

"If there is something they want to see that's not in the workout," Fegan said, "we've given them the chance to see it."

Fegan said each team has also had time to interview Yi personally, take him out to dinner, etc., the same way that teams normally do.

Others said that because Yi has been under-scouted compared to the college crop, the restrictions are especially frustrating.

One GM who's seen him play had this response to those complaints: "They should've done their homework then. Some of us were in China a lot, tracking this kid. You can't leave it up to the agent to do your work for you. I think some teams slept a little bit on Yi and now they fell underprepared. Dan could cooperate with them a little more, but if he doesn't want Yi to play there, why should he?"

Added to that frustration is a sense that Fegan and Yi's Chinese representatives are trying to control the process. It's been known for months that Yi's people prefer he goes to a team in a big city with a substantial Asian-American population. That's why Boston and Chicago were given early looks.

The Hawks have been in to see Yi. So have the Kings. But other teams such as the Grizzlies, Bucks, Timberwolves and Bobcats haven't been able to get a workout.


Where Will Yi Land?

Andrew D. BernsteinNBAE via Getty Images

Yi Jianlian was pumped up during workouts last month in Cali.
The Hawks were the second team to see Yi. They have enough interest at No. 3 that they've requested Yi fly to Atlanta to meet the owners. The word is that Al Horford is likely their target at No. 3, but it seems enough of the Hawks' brass were impressed with Yi to give him a longer look.

Danny Ainge insists that Yi may be the third-most talented player in the draft and is getting strong consideration from the Celtics at No. 5 -- but he also is looking at several other players and potentially trading the pick. Ainge sounds like he thinks Yi may be the top talent at No. 5, but he's concerned enough about some of the question marks that he may opt for a more proven product, such as Florida's Corey Brewer or Georgetown's Jeff Green.

The Bulls would take a long look at him at No. 9, but they also have an affinity for Joakim Noah and would likely select him ahead of Yi if he were still on the board.

The Kings may be his backstop. One source in Sacramento told me they are high enough on Yi that he would be a lock at No. 10 if he fell that far.

If Yi does slip past 10, I'm not sure Yi's camp will consider it a disaster. Their bigger concern coming into the process was finding the right fit for Yi -- not the highest draft position -- and that is why his camp has been so careful with the workouts.

After seeing international players such as Yao Ming and Bargnani shine in a good situation and Darko Milicic suffer in a bad situation, they know that style of play, coaching, organizational culture and the opportunity to play will ultimately determine whether Yi fulfills his enormous potential.

The other teams that have gotten into Yi's workouts -- the Sixers (No. 12), the Clippers (No. 14), the Warriors (No. 18) and the Lakers (No. 19) -- are all trying to move up in the draft and could be good long-term fits for Yi.

Ultimately, a team like the Warriors would make the most sense for Yi. They have a need for an offensive-minded 4, Nellie's style of play fits Yi, and he would be near one of the most robust Asian-American communities.

Whether the Warriors can make a deal to get high enough in the draft to take him remains a question mark.

The Sixers are another intriguing team with a large hole at the power forward position. And the Lakers could try to use Yi to help stop the bleeding if a Kobe Bryant trade happens.


The Yi Conundrum



In the end, Yi may be the highest risk-reward player in the draft. A gambling GM will roll the dice and try to make this athletic, 7-foot-tall jump shooter an NBA All-Star. The conservative GM will take a pass, going for a more proven product from Florida, North Carolina, Kansas or Ohio State.

The gambling GM may be wrong and Yi could turn into nothing more than Tim Thomas -- a big, talented forward who never had what it took to be great. Or the conservative GM could be wrong and Yi could become the next great international star.

At this point no one knows how the story will end. But the intrigue continues to make the NBA draft my favorite event of the year.

Chad Ford covers the NBA for ESPN Insider.
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Old 06-23-2007, 11:04 AM   #26
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorpesaurous
Second Half of the Whole Article:

Are you Dirk Nowitzki or Tim Thomas? Guess we'll just have to wait and see.

Of course the same criticism has been leveled at NBA MVP Dirk Nowitzki for years.

Like Dirk, Yi is going to be a face-the-basket, perimeter-oriented 4 in the NBA -- at least at first. You can expect him to do a lot of spotting up and running the floor on the offensive end. His athleticism and his midrange jump shot are the best things going for him at the moment, and he'll use them. He still needs work on his aggressiveness in hitting the glass and taking advantage of smaller players in the post.

Even his outside shooting isn't entirely a strong suit for him heading into the draft. Several teams have questioned whether Yi will have NBA 3-point range. He shot just 18 percent from the international 3-point line in China this year, and hasn't been shooting it consistently from the NBA arc in some of his workouts.

Dixon said teams shouldn't worry.

"He has a very, very good shot," Dixon said. "In fact he strokes it as well as any big guy you'll see. He's a pick-and-pop, perimeter-oriented guy. I don't have any question about that. The truth is that the coach here didn't really ask him to shoot 3s. I'm not sure they always knew how to use Yi. He was stuck in the post a lot. Our guards were the ones who were supposed to shoot that shot.

"It wasn't really until last year that Yi started stepping behind the line and taking shots. It's not a big part of his game now but it could be. He has flawless mechanics. In practice he's now hitting that shot maybe 65 to 70 percent of the time. Give him a couple of months to adjust to that in the NBA and I don't think it will be an issue."

Dixon also said that the rest of Yi's game points to NBA success.

"Athletically he's ready right now," said Dixon, who said he plays with a lot of the Nuggets in the summer at the Pepsi Center. "He can hang right now. He's still got a lot to learn about the game, but physically he's ready."

And, Dixon said, he is capable handling adversity.

"We had a tough year," he said. "He had a lot of eyes looking at him. Our team wasn't as good as it's been in the past. I think there was pressure to showcase Yi for NBA teams. So Yi was put in a tough position and I think he handled it pretty well."


The Workout Game


A trickle of recent stories suggesting Yi could be slipping in the draft may have been written in part due to the frustration, from media and teams, with the restrictions put on Yi's workouts.

His agent, Dan Fegan, has limited the ability of teams to see Yi, which has led to a spate of criticism from those who haven't been given access.

Yi even skipped the NBA draft combine -- the only player projected in the top 15 to skip the event -- meaning that teams and media didn't get his measurements and the chance to see him in drills.

Although all of the teams that I have spoken with who've seen Yi work out in L.A. have come away impressed, they also have had a level of frustration that they can't see more of him.

However, Fegan says that teams are given hands-on access to Yi. Danny Ainge and Doc Rivers got on the floor with Yi and had the opportunity to take him through specific drills and plays. Others have been afforded the same opportunity.

"If there is something they want to see that's not in the workout," Fegan said, "we've given them the chance to see it."

Fegan said each team has also had time to interview Yi personally, take him out to dinner, etc., the same way that teams normally do.

Others said that because Yi has been under-scouted compared to the college crop, the restrictions are especially frustrating.

One GM who's seen him play had this response to those complaints: "They should've done their homework then. Some of us were in China a lot, tracking this kid. You can't leave it up to the agent to do your work for you. I think some teams slept a little bit on Yi and now they fell underprepared. Dan could cooperate with them a little more, but if he doesn't want Yi to play there, why should he?"

Added to that frustration is a sense that Fegan and Yi's Chinese representatives are trying to control the process. It's been known for months that Yi's people prefer he goes to a team in a big city with a substantial Asian-American population. That's why Boston and Chicago were given early looks.

The Hawks have been in to see Yi. So have the Kings. But other teams such as the Grizzlies, Bucks, Timberwolves and Bobcats haven't been able to get a workout.


Where Will Yi Land?

Andrew D. BernsteinNBAE via Getty Images

Yi Jianlian was pumped up during workouts last month in Cali.
The Hawks were the second team to see Yi. They have enough interest at No. 3 that they've requested Yi fly to Atlanta to meet the owners. The word is that Al Horford is likely their target at No. 3, but it seems enough of the Hawks' brass were impressed with Yi to give him a longer look.

Danny Ainge insists that Yi may be the third-most talented player in the draft and is getting strong consideration from the Celtics at No. 5 -- but he also is looking at several other players and potentially trading the pick. Ainge sounds like he thinks Yi may be the top talent at No. 5, but he's concerned enough about some of the question marks that he may opt for a more proven product, such as Florida's Corey Brewer or Georgetown's Jeff Green.

The Bulls would take a long look at him at No. 9, but they also have an affinity for Joakim Noah and would likely select him ahead of Yi if he were still on the board.

The Kings may be his backstop. One source in Sacramento told me they are high enough on Yi that he would be a lock at No. 10 if he fell that far.

If Yi does slip past 10, I'm not sure Yi's camp will consider it a disaster. Their bigger concern coming into the process was finding the right fit for Yi -- not the highest draft position -- and that is why his camp has been so careful with the workouts.

After seeing international players such as Yao Ming and Bargnani shine in a good situation and Darko Milicic suffer in a bad situation, they know that style of play, coaching, organizational culture and the opportunity to play will ultimately determine whether Yi fulfills his enormous potential.

The other teams that have gotten into Yi's workouts -- the Sixers (No. 12), the Clippers (No. 14), the Warriors (No. 18) and the Lakers (No. 19) -- are all trying to move up in the draft and could be good long-term fits for Yi.

Ultimately, a team like the Warriors would make the most sense for Yi. They have a need for an offensive-minded 4, Nellie's style of play fits Yi, and he would be near one of the most robust Asian-American communities.

Whether the Warriors can make a deal to get high enough in the draft to take him remains a question mark.

The Sixers are another intriguing team with a large hole at the power forward position. And the Lakers could try to use Yi to help stop the bleeding if a Kobe Bryant trade happens.


The Yi Conundrum



In the end, Yi may be the highest risk-reward player in the draft. A gambling GM will roll the dice and try to make this athletic, 7-foot-tall jump shooter an NBA All-Star. The conservative GM will take a pass, going for a more proven product from Florida, North Carolina, Kansas or Ohio State.

The gambling GM may be wrong and Yi could turn into nothing more than Tim Thomas -- a big, talented forward who never had what it took to be great. Or the conservative GM could be wrong and Yi could become the next great international star.

At this point no one knows how the story will end. But the intrigue continues to make the NBA draft my favorite event of the year.

Chad Ford covers the NBA for ESPN Insider.

Thank you so much Mr. Thorpesaurus for posting the whole Article, we are glad that the OP is telling the truth and his stats are correct.
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Old 06-23-2007, 11:08 AM   #27
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

I'm interested by this guy. I wouldn't have a problem with the Celtics taking him, but I'd prefer if it were in some combination of moving Pierce. They need to either **** or get off the toilet already. They're an odd team that can legitimately go in a number of directions. I could see them taking Conley, and turning the team over to him, with Green and Jefferson as a three man rotation. I could see them taking what's leftover of Horton or Wright if they're left, and just moving Al inside. They could figure that they're so young that they'd be best off rolling the dice with a huge upside guy like Yi anyway, because even if he doesn't work out, they still have a few years before they're truly competitive anyway. They could even take Noah, figuring his non-ball needed, high post type of game would pair up well with Jefferson, and free him up to get the overwhelming majority of touches in the hole. Or they could still move some of the youth and try to pair Pierce up with somebody.

As for Yi, I saw enough of him in the last round of international play that I really wasn't that thrilled, but the more he works out, the better he sounds. He sort of reminds me of Bargnani last year, who I wasn't crazy about, because I really don't know what position he plays. He was abysmal defensively in every international game I saw him in. And vert numbers aside, there's no way he can defend the three in the NBA. And at the moment, he lacks both the strength and the toughness to defend in the post either. You'd be giving up both defense and rebounding if you lined him up at PF, let alone C. These tweener guys are always huge gambles, and there's almost no way to tell weather or not your getting one that'll work or not.
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Old 06-23-2007, 11:15 AM   #28
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Default Re: Yi's measurements

I hope the Warriors get him. that'd be ideal.
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Old 06-23-2007, 11:25 AM   #29
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What i like about Yi Jianlian is he have an excellent footwork for his size and He so agile for his height unlike many legit 7 footers who cannot even move with out the ball. I think teams that would pick Yi Jianlian would be rewarded with a player that will be a consistent scorer and defender for his team.
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Old 06-23-2007, 11:28 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeeCee15
Yi does not have anything close to 38 inch max vertical leap.
The espn guy must be on crack.

If he had a 38 inch vert at his height..he would be doing windmills from the FT line.

OF all the videos I've seen of Yi and of all the dunks i've seen..if he had a 38 inch vert OR even if he jumped like 33 inches...those dunks would be a helluva lot better.

38'' vertical does not = a flashy dunker.
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