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Old 11-25-2012, 10:05 PM   #6
fpliii
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Default Re: on ball perimeter defense: the most unappreciated aspect of basketball stat geeks

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethgriffin
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBu28UwDzps

one of the greatest to ever do it. constantly disrespected. constantly overlooked. constantly underrated.

there is rarely a stat for it. it is measured by watching games. there isn't always a steal. there isn't always a block. but theres always great foot work.

the most unappreciated kind of defender. it requires more talent than a big man due to handchecking rules being 100 times more constant on the perimeter

just watch the video and understand why he has 9 first team all defensive awards. the most in nba history

Historically not so much, but since the latest hand-checking guidlelines were implemented I agree to some extent. Being able to shut your man down without getting called for a foul is huge in today's league (since the mid-2000s). Various rule changes:

widening of the lane twice
five seconds back to the basket
how zone defense is called
how 3 seconds (on offense and defense) are called
three-pointer
handchecking changes (not once but twice, I believe though there might've been a third guidelines changed)

have moved the game away from the basket. Perimeter players can't really anchor a defense (the exception being Pippen for the Bulls), but they can be nearly as important to schemes in today's game, especially if they can shut down their matchups while staying on the court and remaining productive offensively.

This is of course assuming you separate rebounding from defense. If rebounding is counted as part of a defender's impact then even in today's league, which is designed for dominant wings to succeed at the highest level, then perimeter players can't come close to impacting a game on that side of the ball (NOTE: I don't care if my PG contributes anything defensively, so I'm talking exclusively about 2's and 3's).
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