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-   -   Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats (http://www.insidehoops.com/forum/showthread.php?t=268252)

julizaver 06-21-2012 11:16 AM

Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Game 1 – Boston won by 9 pts
Chamberlain 14-24 FG, 5-11 FT, 25 rebs, 5 asts, 1 PF, 33 points
Russell 5-8 FG, 1-4 FT, 22 rebs, 4 asts, 4 PF, 11 points

Game 2 – Phila won by 9 pts
Chamberlain 6-14 FG, 3-6 FT, 19 rebs, 8 asts, 2 PF, 15 points
Russell 5-12 FG, 1-3 FT, 20 rebs, 5 asts, 1 PF, 11 points

Game 3 – Phila won by 8 pts
Chamberlain 10-19 FG, 3-12 FT, 25 rebs, 6 asts, 3 PF, 23 points
Russell 4-17 FG, 5-6 FT, 20 rebs, 3 asts, 5 PF, 13 points

Game 4 – Phila won by 5 pts
Chamberlain 7-11 FG, 8-13 FT, 16 rebs, 8 asts, 5 PF, 22 points
Russell 9-18 FG, 6-7 FT, 24 rebs, 3 asts, 3 PF, 24 points

Game 5 – Boston won by 18 pts
Chamberlain 11-21 FG, 6-11 FT, 30 rebs, 7 asts, 0 PF, 28 points
Russell 4-10 FG, 0-0 FT, 24 rebs, 4 asts, 4 PF, 8 points

Game 6 – Boston won by 8 pts
Chamberlain 6-21 FG, 8-23 FT, 27 rebs, 8 asts, 1 PF, 20 points
Russell 6-13 FG, 5-7 FT, 31 rebs, 5 asts, 5 PF, 17 points

Game 7 – Boston won by 4 pts
Chamberlain 4-9 FG, 6-15 FT, 34 rebs, 5 asts, 2 PF, 14 points
Russell 4-6 FG, 4-10 FT, 26 rebs, 5 asts, 5 PF, 12 points, 10 blocks

Averages for the series:

Chamberlain 22.14 ppg, 25.14 rpg, 6.71 apg, 0.487 FG, 0.429 FT
Russell 13.71 ppg, 23.86 rpg, 4.14 apg, 0.440 FG, 0.595 FT

jlauber 06-21-2012 07:54 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by julizaver
Game 1 – Boston won by 9 pts
Chamberlain 14-24 FG, 5-11 FT, 25 rebs, 5 asts, 1 PF, 33 points
Russell 5-8 FG, 1-4 FT, 22 rebs, 4 asts, 4 PF, 11 points

Game 2 – Phila won by 9 pts
Chamberlain 6-14 FG, 3-6 FT, 19 rebs, 8 asts, 2 PF, 15 points
Russell 5-12 FG, 1-3 FT, 20 rebs, 5 asts, 1 PF, 11 points

Game 3 – Phila won by 8 pts
Chamberlain 10-19 FG, 3-12 FT, 25 rebs, 6 asts, 3 PF, 23 points
Russell 4-17 FG, 5-6 FT, 20 rebs, 3 asts, 5 PF, 13 points

Game 4 – Phila won by 5 pts
Chamberlain 7-11 FG, 8-13 FT, 16 rebs, 8 asts, 5 PF, 22 points
Russell 9-18 FG, 6-7 FT, 24 rebs, 3 asts, 3 PF, 24 points

Game 5 – Boston won by 18 pts
Chamberlain 11-21 FG, 6-11 FT, 30 rebs, 7 asts, 0 PF, 28 points
Russell 4-10 FG, 0-0 FT, 24 rebs, 4 asts, 4 PF, 8 points

Game 6 – Boston won by 8 pts
Chamberlain 6-21 FG, 8-23 FT, 27 rebs, 8 asts, 1 PF, 20 points
Russell 6-13 FG, 5-7 FT, 31 rebs, 5 asts, 5 PF, 17 points

Game 7 – Boston won by 4 pts
Chamberlain 4-9 FG, 6-15 FT, 34 rebs, 5 asts, 2 PF, 14 points
Russell 4-6 FG, 4-10 FT, 26 rebs, 5 asts, 5 PF, 12 points, 10 blocks

Averages for the series:

Chamberlain 22.14 ppg, 25.14 rpg, 6.71 apg, 0.487 FG, 0.429 FT
Russell 13.71 ppg, 23.86 rpg, 4.14 apg, 0.440 FG, 0.595 FT


Great stuff. Glad to have you back!

This was probably Russell's best effort against Chamberlain in their eight career H2H playoff series. I give Russell a solid edge in game six, and a split in game's four and seven (maybe even a slight edge in game seven.)

Having said that though, it was obvious that Wilt was hurting badly in that series. Even Russell himself acknowledged that. And, with a similar injury to what reduced Reed to a partial observer, or no show, in the last three games of the '70 Finals...Wilt PLAYED EVERY minute of that series. And according to the recaps, Chamberlain was noticeably limping from game two on. His last two games were clearly his worst, although his teammates' reluctance to pass him the ball in the second half of game seven was the main reason why he only scored 14 points in that game (and the key Sixers, aside from Wilt, collectively shot 25-74 in that game.)

Here again, though, the "Wilt-bashers" will rip Chamberlain for "choking" in this series, but very few will give Russell his due.

CavaliersFTW 01-06-2014 04:20 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
This is the thread that deserves a discussion on this series :applause:

Psileas 01-06-2014 05:23 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Game 5 – Boston won by 18 pts
Chamberlain 11-21 FG, 6-11 FT, 30 rebs, 7 asts, 0 PF, 28 points
Russell 4-10 FG, 0-0 FT, 24 rebs, 4 asts, 4 PF, 8 points

That's a 1967-like line for Wilt. The bolded parts are the ones in which Wilt outperformed Russell in that game.
Havlicek with 37 points, Sam Jones with 29. Chet Walker with 12, injured Jackson with 7.
Celtics: 10 players on the rotation, Sixers 8

If all of these facts don't indicate to you that Wilt had the better team, I don't know what to tell you...

Iceman#44 01-06-2014 07:19 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Great stuff! You guys are amazing!

Pushxx 01-06-2014 07:22 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Fucking Hondo. So damn underrated.

La Frescobaldi 01-06-2014 07:33 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Psileas
That's a 1967-like line for Wilt. The bolded parts are the ones in which Wilt outperformed Russell in that game.
Havlicek with 37 points, Sam Jones with 29. Chet Walker with 12, injured Jackson with 7.
Celtics: 10 players on the rotation, Sixers 8

If all of these facts don't indicate to you that Wilt had the better team, I don't know what to tell you...


That '68 season was the year Hondo John Havlicek rose to the top of the league. He ran wild from '68 right up to about '76 or '77 when that amazing athlete finally started to slow down. Havlicek carried the Celtics on his back a whole lot in '69 as Sam Jones faded and to this day there's no question in my mind he was the best player on the court in that Finals and should have got that first FMVP.

Jerry West was phenomenal and well-deserved in some ways. But Havlicek was just everywhere, all the time.

He had a funny running jumper in his arsenal, his whole body leaning forward at about a 40 degree angle, and that shot was just about unstoppable.... and pure money.
He had a great post game, spins, over and unders, and he could make some amazing assists too. If anything, his defense was even superior to his offense. He could really lock guys down - anybody.

I don't know who really invented the teardrop shot - I'm sure it was probably some guy in the 40s or something. But Havlicek is the guy who I remember using it first. He could get his shot off against guys like Willis Reed or Chamberlain and he was one of the VERY few that could do it. Did he get that ball jammed back in his face? You bet he did... but he made a lot of those fabulous high arcing shots, too.

Just a great, great player, one of the best to ever play, and probably the most underrated NBA player in the Land of Ish. OK, maybe Sam Jones.

LAZERUSS 01-06-2014 08:05 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Psileas
That's a 1967-like line for Wilt. The bolded parts are the ones in which Wilt outperformed Russell in that game.
Havlicek with 37 points, Sam Jones with 29. Chet Walker with 12, injured Jackson with 7.
Celtics: 10 players on the rotation, Sixers 8

If all of these facts don't indicate to you that Wilt had the better team, I don't know what to tell you...


Yeah...that was the Wilt who lacked that "killer instinct" when his team was up 3-1. He just mailed it in that game five.

dankok8 01-06-2014 10:16 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jlauber
Great stuff. Glad to have you back!

This was probably Russell's best effort against Chamberlain in their eight career H2H playoff series. I give Russell a solid edge in game six, and a split in game's four and seven (maybe even a slight edge in game seven.)

Having said that though, it was obvious that Wilt was hurting badly in that series. Even Russell himself acknowledged that. And, with a similar injury to what reduced Reed to a partial observer, or no show, in the last three games of the '70 Finals...Wilt PLAYED EVERY minute of that series. And according to the recaps, Chamberlain was noticeably limping from game two on. His last two games were clearly his worst, although his teammates' reluctance to pass him the ball in the second half of game seven was the main reason why he only scored 14 points in that game (and the key Sixers, aside from Wilt, collectively shot 25-74 in that game.)

Here again, though, the "Wilt-bashers" will rip Chamberlain for "choking" in this series, but very few will give Russell his due.


I think in '69 Finals Russell did even better and outplayed Wilt but that's a fair post. In the '68 EDF I would definitely give Russell an edge in Game 4, 6, and 7 though.

And Wilt did UNDERPERFORM in both Game 6 and Game 7. That much is not debatable. 33% from the field and 37% from the line.

La Frescobaldi 01-06-2014 10:24 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dankok8
I think in '69 Finals Russell did even better and outplayed Wilt but that's a fair post. In the '68 EDF I would definitely give Russell an edge in Game 4, 6, and 7 though.

And Wilt did UNDERPERFORM in both Game 6 and Game 7. That much is not debatable. 33% from the field and 37% from the line.


Funny enough Embry guarded him off the bench & Wayne just wasn't any Russell. He was like a tree trunk, though, and had lots of experience guarding #13. That had to be a weird experience, suddenly finding that brick wall in the paint.

dankok8 01-06-2014 10:46 PM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by La Frescobaldi
Funny enough Embry guarded him off the bench & Wayne just wasn't any Russell. He was like a tree trunk, though, and had lots of experience guarding #13. That had to be a weird experience, suddenly finding that brick wall in the paint.


Wilt really stopped himself in Game 7 not demanding shots. His teammates to deserve a bit of the blame though. He barely even touched the ball... In Game 6 it may well have been Embry. I mean that was the game when they should have closed it out. Greer scored 40 and Walker/Goukas had strong performances as well.

Also apparently from the recaps then Wilt sprained his calf muscle in Game 3 (and limped for the rest of that game), the trainer Al Domanico said it's nothing serious. Wilt himself never used the injury as an excuse either even though he did lie about MLK's death as if it happened after Game 4. Truth is King was assassinated before the series and there was a major delay in play after Boston's Game 1 win so if anything that killed Boston's momentum, not Philly's as Wilt claimed...

LAZERUSS 01-07-2014 01:41 AM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dankok8
Wilt really stopped himself in Game 7 not demanding shots. His teammates to deserve a bit of the blame though. He barely even touched the ball... In Game 6 it may well have been Embry. I mean that was the game when they should have closed it out. Greer scored 40 and Walker/Goukas had strong performances as well.

Also apparently from the recaps then Wilt sprained his calf muscle in Game 3 (and limped for the rest of that game), the trainer Al Domanico said it's nothing serious. Wilt himself never used the injury as an excuse either even though he did lie about MLK's death as if it happened after Game 4. Truth is King was assassinated before the series and there was a major delay in play after Boston's Game 1 win so if anything that killed Boston's momentum, not Philly's as Wilt claimed...


Chamberlain was LIMPING throughout the series, and had SEVERAL injuries. The calf muscle was torn. And no, Wilt never used ANY injury as an excuse.

And it was HANNUM's fault for allowing the Chamberlain's teammates to shoot a ghastly 33-96 from the field in that game seven, while Wilt touched the ball seven times in the second half.

And the series SHOULD have been closed out in game five when Chamberlain, the on you claimed had no killer instinct, again just slaughtered Russell in every aspect of the game.

And a healthy Wilt, and a healthy Sixer squad repeats the 4-1 series blowout in '67. Not even debatable.

Incidently, I wonder how many other players have posted a 22-25-7 series in post-season NBA history...all while badly outplaying their HOF counterpart at both of ends of the floor, and doing with injuries that would have shelved a KAJ or Reed? And, where were Russell's 33 point or 30 rebound games in that series...and again...against a Wilt was was just a shell?

PHILA 01-07-2014 02:08 AM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
Quote:

injuries


It was deemed remarkable that they even got to the Division Finals vs. Boston with all the injuries. Luke Jackson was playing with a badly pulled hamstring. When Lakers star Magic pulled his hamstring in '89 Finals, he could not even play the final game at all & much of the third game. While the 1989 Lakers get excused due to injury, the '68 Sixers do not. Back in the old days they were expected to gut it out under worse playing conditions, as Jackson did when he played the entire 1966 season on a broken leg, casually shrugging it off as shin splints.

There were times during the NY series when the hobbled Sixers were getting killed on the boards, as Bellamy & Reed were feasting on the offensive glass. They played Games 4, 5, and 6 consecutively. No days off in between. :no:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwCmKvHJNoQ&t=16m20s



New York Times - Apr 18, 1968

But injuries have depleted the team that ended the Celtics' eight-year reign last season. Wally Jones, the jump-shooting Philadelphia guard with the game-breaking touch, is doubtful for Friday. He aggravated his right knee, first injured during the series with the New York Knickerbockers, early in the opening quarter and did not return.

Wilt Chamberlain, the 7-foot pillar of the 76ers, produced 20 points but was in obvious pain with an ailing right leg.





Williamson Daily News - Apr 10, 1968






DELAWARE COUNTY - April 13, 1968

Club Rated 'Most Courageous' By Hannum as Injuries Mount

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The Philadelphia 76ers could be billed as the best touring troupe In basketball. All they need is a doctor to complete the cast.

Going into the fourth game Sunday of their National Basketball Association playoff series with the Boston Celtics, the 76ers are hurting from head to toe.

So what's new? Injuries have plagued the defending NBA champions since the opening of the season.

"Alex Hannum says this is the most courageous team he's ever coached," says Harvey Pollack, the 76ers' statistician. "The locker room looks like a hospital ward every time I walk in."

Pollack ticked off some of the cases, which read like a medical diary:

-Wilt Chamberlain (partial tear of the calf muscle in his right leg, a strain in his right thigh and an injured right toe):

-Wally Jones (injured knee cartilage):

-Luke Jackson (pulled hamstring muscle):

-Hal Greer (bursitus in his right knee):

-And, Billy Cunningham (broken right wrist).

"That's not mentioning (rookie) Jim Reid who had a knee operation after injuring it the first game of the season," said Pollack, "and Larry Costello," the veteran guard who tore an ankle tendon after one-third of the season was gone.

The most recent injury was to Chamberlain in Friday night's Eastern Division playoff contest with the Celtics. The dipper was given whirlpool treatments for the calf muscle tear, but Pollack wasn't sure how he'd respond.

The 76ers have nine men in uniform for the best-of-seven playoffs, which they lead, two games to one. But whether they'll have anybody left for the finals against the Western Division winner is anybody's guess.

The team's troubles multiplied in the Eastern Division semifinals against the New York Knickerbockers. Cunningham broke his wrist, knocking him out for the season, Jones and Jackson suffered their injuries and Chamberlain aggravated his perennial toe injury.

And when Boston thumped the 76ers in the opening game of their playoffs here last Friday, some predicted a quick knockout of the injury-riddled champs.

But Philadelphia whacked Boston two straight, including Thursday where an injury actually helped the 76ers cause, points out Pollack.

How so?

"Well, Chamberlain was hurt and he couldn't turn around to score-so he kept feeding Greer, and he scored 31," explained the statistician.

PHILA 01-07-2014 02:09 AM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
DELAWARE COUNTY - April 4, 1968

There they are—the Philadelphia 76ers. See them gulp pills. Notice their bandages. Watch how they limp. Look at how they struggle.


They are sick and battered invalids. Pain and fatigue stagger hand in hand. They do not belong on a basketball court, they belong in wheelchairs.


There are only eight of them left now, and seven are ailing. They're wearing so much tape -they look like mummies in short pants. Do you wonder how they keep playing? Or why?


* * *


The 76ers will return to their rightful place at the Spectrum Friday night to meet the Boston Celtics in the Eastern Division finals.


From a New York viewpoint, the older 76ers should not have beaten the youthful, deep Knicks in the semifinals. After, the Knicks evened the series at 2-2, New York newspapers had buried the 76ers. The act seemed to b e contagious.


Loyalists in Philadelphia started believing it, too. But it was mostly the New York press. And when the 76ers resisted the early burial last Sunday, the New York press became cranky.


The sour grapes began to spill. A sportswriter who is one of the very biggest in New York City characterized the mood when he spent a greater part of the afternoon last Sunday complaining loudly and bitterly about the location of the TV cameras during foul shots. As a result, several heated arguments between TV and NBA officials and the writer developed along the sidelines.


It was exemplary of the New York mood, which was soon compounded by the 76ers' demoralizing 123-105 victory.


* * *


The turning point of the series was Sunday. The Knicks, feeling they could take advantage of the 76ers' badly battered and undermanned squad, suffered a psychological breakdown after the battered and undermanned 76ers destroyed them in the fifth game.


Then in the third game in three days Monday — an incredible piece of scheduling by the NBA—the 76ers administered the coupe de grace as the Knicks fell apartafter blowing a big early lead.


Winning the rough, bruising series with a team riddled by injuries and its bench practically stripped may — under the circumstances — be one of the most remarkable feats in NBA history.


* * *


A TEAM playing under these conditions should not be expected to survive such a series. Have you ever tried driving a car on three wheels?"


But the fact that the 76ers did win was a glowing tribute to the sheer determination and dedication of a proud team; one whose supreme pride shunned defeat in the face of most dire circumstances.


You had to be there to appreciate it . . . the way Hal Greer and Wally Jones ran and shot on battered knees; the way Wilt Chamberlain played the middle with a volcano in his stomach and an injured toe shot full of needles; the way Johnny Green kept hustling although long past the point of exhaustion; the way Luke Jackson, Chet Walker and Matt Goukas played their guts out despite assorted injuries.


It was an effort propelled by a strong motivation; dedication to a mission known as winning. These were driven men. Old pros who refused to buckle.


The Knick series can be forgotten now. The 76ers face a new challenge; one that is much bigger. Can they produce another maximum effort against Boston?


* * *


THERE THEY are — the Philadelphia 76ers. See how they scrap. Watch how they claw.


Notice their contempt for adversity.






Fond Du Lac Commonwealth Reporter - March 30, 1968

Injuries Plague 76ers

The Philadelphia 76ers, a team some rank as the physically strongest in professional basketball history, are in trouble. The trouble is injuries—to handyman Bill Cunningham and starting forward Luke Jackson, and to a lesser degree the two standouts of the defending world champions, Wilt Chamberlain and Hal Greer.

Cunningham broke his right wrist in the double overtime, 138-132 victory over New York which gave the 76ers a 2-1 lead in the best-of-seven series Wednesday night at Philadelphia. Cunningham shoots southpaw, but the injury has kayoed him for the year.

Jackson, the brutish, 6-foot-9 forward who supplies Wilt with rebounding assistance, has a hamstring pull, and was a doubtful performer when the series resumed at Madison Square Garden today.

Chamberlain has been taking cortisone shots in his right toe, and Greer, the middle-distance shooting star, has a knee which troubles him and on which he wears a brace.

Wally Wonder

It appears that Wally Jones, Greer's partner at guard who unblushingly dubbed himself "Wally Wonder," and Chet Walker, the smooth cornerman, are the only healthy 76er starters now.

The team, which ended Boston's domination last winter and then went on to stop San Francisco in the final playoff, was conceded as good a chance this season before the injuries set in. To make matters worse, the current opponent— the Knicks—is a young team which is just starting to feel its oats. The Knicks would enjoy nothing more than knocking off the world champions, and you can bet that Boston will be cheering for them.

Those who watch the pros over ABC each Sunday afternoon will have a chance to watch two games tomorrow. ABC announced Thursday that it will "split" its telecasting time, switching from the 76ers-Knicks' game to the Pistons-Celtics' match and back as the occasion arises.

This will give fans a chance to watch pivotal games in the Eastern Division playoffs, from which will probably spring the eventual champion.

The Pistons and Celtics are tied at 2-2 after Boston's 135- 110 win Thursday. Detroit, which won 10 of its last 13 games to beat out Cincinnati for the fourth playoff spot in the East, has given Boston a stronger run than the aging Celtics expected.

The two playoff series will probably be decided by the play of the two men who have dominated the game in recent years, Chamberlain and Bill Russell.

Counting On Wilt

With his team crippled by injuries, 76ers coach Alex Hannum said Friday that he is counting on Chamberlain to carry his club through against the Knicks. For Boston, player-coach Russell must play well for the Celtics to win.

Both teams depend on their big men to lead them to success. In both cases, the chores have been handed to capable men. So it will come as no surprise if the Celtics and 76ers end up in the Eastern Division's final round.

But the Knickerbockers will have something to say before it's over, and the Pistons likewise. The more experienced 76ers and Celtics are hoping the youngsters remember an old saying which goes, "Children should be seen and not heard."






Lawrence Daily Journal World - April 29, 1968

There never has been a keener rivalry in athletics than the one between basketball's Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell.

But while they go at it tooth and nail on the court, Wilt of Philly and Bill of Boston have great respect for each other.

After the Celtics edged the 76ers in the Eastern playoffs — mainly because the 76ers turned stone cold from the floor m the second half — Chamberlain led his mates to the Boston dressing room to congratulate the Celts.

But Russell, sportsman that he is, was quick to turn it around and laud Wilt, who played the final game with a bad leg injury. "Any lesser man wouldn't even be on the court, yet here was Wilt out there giving it all be had," Bill said.

At one point, Celt guard Larry Siegfried tried to stop Wilt from making a dunk by wrapping both arms around him The fabulous 7-1 strongman merely unleashed his fantastic power and flipped the 6-4, 215 pound Siegfried clear off the end of the court. Russell has often said he never hangs or to a jump ball too long with Chamberlain: "I'm always afraid he'll pick both of us up and stuff us through the hoop, Russell chortles. Everyone in the NBA contends Chamberlain is the strongest man they've ever encountered.

LAZERUSS 01-07-2014 02:43 AM

Re: Wilt Chamberlain vs Bill Russell 1968 EDF stats
 
:rockon:

This should finally put to rest these RIDICULOUS claims that Wilt "choked" in the '68 EDF's (or that Philly "choked.")

As Russell said, a lessor man would not have played. Or in other words, NO ONE else would have played with what Chamberlain was playing EVERY minute of that series with. Oh, and he "choked" his way to a 22-25-7 series, as well. Here again, how many other "GOATS" have had series like that...and blown away their counterpart in the process...all at well below 100%?

My god, Kareem missed a Finals clinching game with a sprained ankle. He missed chunks of seasons with broken wrists. And Wilt? He gets ripped for taking himself out of a game for two minutes (and then wasn't allowed back in by an idiotic and bull-headed coach who essentially cost his team a ring.)

And where are those that should have PRAISED Chamberlain from coming back WAY AHEAD of schedule from major knee surgery in the '70 post-season? Nope, when a one-legged Chamberlain carries his under-dog team to a game seven against a heavily favored team, and in fact, is the only player on his team to play well in that game...well, it was WILT who "choked." And Reed, with his injured leg, and doing absolutely nothing in the last three pivotal games of that series...is the HERO. Here again, Wilt, with a similar injury that Reed had in the '70 Finals, put up a 22-25-7 series in '68, playing EVERY minute, and HE is the one who "choked."

Broken wrist? Hell, Chamberlain PLAYED with one badly sprained wrist, and the other FRACTURED in the clinching game five win in the '72 Finals. Played is an understatement. he absolutely DOMINATED that game (24 points, on 10-14 shooting, with 29 rebounds, and 8 blocks.) Does anyone in their right mind believe that Kareem would have played in that game (or series)?

Just more of the many ridiculous Wilt DOUBLE-STANDARDS.

Thanks again PHILA for this brilliant research!


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